magnifier
Image
magbottom
 
Edward Goodrich Acheson in the lab with his omnipresent cigar, testing Aquadag, a colloidal suspension of his artificial graphite, circa 1910.
Close Window

Edward Goodrich Acheson in the lab with his omnipresent cigar, testing Aquadag, a colloidal suspension of his artificial graphite.

Credit: Courtesy of Acheson Industries.

After his invention of carborundum, Edward Acheson continued to develop new products and processes for which he received 70 patents, and became heralded as one of the great chemists of early 20th century. Philadelphia's Franklin Institute awarded him two John Scott medals, the first for carborundum and the second, in 1901, for his discovery of artificial graphite.

Back to Top